In this blog you will find the correct answer of the Coursera quiz Social Psychology Coursera Answer mixsaver always try to brings best blogs and best coupon codes
 

1. COURSE TIP: We recommend you join Social Psychology Network before beginning the Snapshot Quiz. Once you’re a member, you’ll be able to set up an SPN page for Assignment #2 and display Coursera Certificates on your page after the class ends. Joining is free for certificate-track learners, discounted to $10 for other learners, and strictly optional.

QUIZ INSTRUCTIONS: This brief quiz will set up the course by creating a record of your knowledge before watching the lectures or completing any readings. If you’re not sure of an answer, take your best guess rather than skipping the item because your answers will be referred to later in the course.

Question 1

Please answer whether the following statements are true or false (if you’re not sure, just take your best guess at what seems “mostly true” or “mostly false”).

(1a) Five people will usually generate more solutions to a difficult problem if they work together in person than if they work alone during the same period of time.

  • True
  • False

(1b) When it comes to choosing dating and marriage partners, the expression “opposites attract” is generally true.

  • True
  • False

(1c) Compared with men, women are usually faster to fall in love and slower to end a relationship.

  • True
  • False

(1d) Social judgments made during the first minute of meeting a stranger are not usually reliable and accurate.

  • True
  • False

(1e) After people have rejected a large request that you’ve made of them, they’re more likely to reject smaller requests as well

  • True
  • False

(1f) In a tug-of-war game with the same number of people on each side of the rope, people pull harder when they’re part of an eight-person team than when they’re pulling alone.

  • True
  • False

(1g) Punching a pillow or screaming out loud is an effective way to reduce frustration and aggressive tendencies

  • True
  • False

2. Question 2

(2a) If you saw someone having a seizure (e.g., someone fall to the floor and begin shaking uncontrollably), what would you do?

  • I would definitely try to help the person
  • I would probably try to help the person
  • I would probably not try to help the person
  • I would definitely not try to help the person

(2b) Suppose a researcher did an experiment using an actor who pretended to have a seizure, and the researcher found that 11 out of 15 people did not help the person. If you had been in the experiment, what do you think your response would have been?

  • I would definitely try to help the person
  • I would probably try to help the person
  • I would probably not try to help the person
  • I would definitely not try to help the person

NOTE: Skipped items will appear without an answer in the lecture videos. Please consider completing all items even if you’re not sure of the answer.

3. Question 3

(3) In the past year, have you used a disposable product such as a styrofoam or plastic cup?

  • Yes
  • No

4. Question 4

(4) If you had to guess, which of these two political candidates is more competent (skilled, experienced, and capable)?

  • Candidate A
  • Candidate B

NOTE: Skipped items will appear without an answer in the lecture videos. Please consider completing all items even if you’re not sure of the answer.

5. Question 5

(5a) In 2-3 sentences (200-500 characters), try to explain the reason for this research finding: “All things being equal, physically attractive people are seen as less intelligent than physically unattractive people.”

(5b) Is this finding what you would have expected?

  • Yes, I would have guessed this to be true
  • No, I wouldn’t have guessed this to be true

NOTE: Skipped items will appear without an answer in the lecture videos. Please consider completing all items even if you’re not sure of the answer.

6. Question 6

(6) Suppose each card below has a letter on one side and a number on the other, and someone tells you: “If a card has a vowel on one side, then it has an even number on the other side.”

Which of the cards would you need to flip over if you wanted to find out whether the person is lying? Check all that apply:

  • Card A
  • Card D
  • Card 4
  • Card 7

NOTE: Skipped items will appear without an answer in the lecture videos. Please consider completing all items even if you’re not sure of the answer.

7. Question 7

Suppose some researchers are interested in whether a particular symptom is associated with a common disease, so they do a year-long study of 150 people and find the following results:

 

       Disease Present  Disease Absent

Symptom         

Presen           80                            40

Symptom              

Absent           20                            10

(7a) In a table like this, which cells do you need to examine in order to determine whether a symptom is associated with a disease? Check all that apply:

  • Upper left cell
  • Lower left cell
  • Upper right cell
  • Lower right cell

(7b) In this particular case, is the symptom positively associated with the disease?

  • Yes, the disease is more likely when the symptom is present
  • No, the disease is not more likely when the symptom is present

NOTE: Skipped items will appear without an answer in the lecture videos. Please consider completing all items even if you’re not sure of the answer.

8. Question 8

(8) If you want to reduce cheating on things like tax returns or exams, would it be more effective to have people sign a declaration of honesty (an honor code) at the top or bottom of the tax return or exam?

  • No difference
  • At the top (before they complete the form)
  • At the bottom (to certify truth of answers given)

NOTE: Skipped items will appear without an answer in the lecture videos. Please consider completing all items even if you’re not sure of the answer.

9. Question 9

(9) Please rank the following items from “1” (most) to “4” (least) in how much happiness people report experiencing while doing the activity:

  • Watching television:   2
  • Shopping, errands:      1(most)
  • Preparing food:            3
  • Exercising:                    4(least)

NOTE: Skipped items will appear without an answer in the lecture videos. Please consider completing all items even if you’re not sure of the answer.

Snapshot Quiz, Part 2: Complete before Lecture 1.4

1. Question 1

Please tell us a little about you so that we know who’s in the course. We’ll then give the class a statistical summary so that you know who your classmates are (but we won’t ever share information that would personally identify individual students).

(1) Have you taken a social psychology class before?

  • Yes
  • No

(2) What type of online courses, if any, have you enrolled in previously? Check all that apply:

  • A Coursera course
  • A class offered by EdX or Udacity
  • A different online course
  • This is my first online course

(3) Are you planning to complete this course and earn a Course Certificate?

  • Yes
  • No

(4) Are you currently a member of Social Psychology Network?

  • Yes, I was a member before signing up for this course
  • Yes, I joined after signing up for this course
  • Not yet, but I plan to join before the course ends
  • No, and I don’t have plans to join before the course ends

(5) Are you currently employed as a teacher, and if so, what do you teach?

  • I am not employed as a teacher
  • I teach psychology at the college or university level
  • I teach at the college or university level, but not psychology
  • I teach at the high school level
  • I teach, but not in one of the categories above

(6) In what country do you currently reside?

(7) In daily life, what language do you speak most often?

(8) What is your gender?

(9) What is your age?

(10) Are you Hispanic or Latino?

  • Yes, I am
  • No, I am not

(11) Which race best describes you?

(12) How much formal schooling have you completed?

Note: If the education system in your country is different from the United States, please choose the answer that comes closest to matching your education status.

(13) Before enrolling in this course, had you heard of Wesleyan University?

  • Yes
  • No

(14) What affiliation, if any, do you have with Wesleyan University? Check all that apply:

  • Current student
  • Former student
  • Current faculty member
  • Current non-faculty employee
  • Parent of current or former Wesleyan student
  • None of the above

(15) Are you taking this course with anyone you know? Check all that apply:

  • Yes, one or more friends
  • Yes, one or more family members
  • Yes, one or more coworkers
  • Yes, but not a friend, family member, or coworker
  • No, I’m not taking this course with anyone I know

Assignment #1: The Random Assignment Assignment

Tutorial: Lesson 1 of 4

Random Sample of 50 Students from a Population of 643

Survey researchers often use random sampling to measure public opinion because it’s much cheaper to survey a representative sample of the public than to survey everyone. With the form below, it’s easy to generate a random sample.

Let’s say you’re interested in studying student attitudes toward climate change. If you wanted to randomly sample 50 students out of 643 at a local school, you would need to number all 643 students (Student 001, 002, 003, etc.) and then use the Randomizer form to generate 1 set of 50 unique numbers with a range from 1 to 643.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-cCK3K9OlRwo/X39QeTpHcsI/AAAAAAAAAKw/Itsq4rgxgz8dv-IKypWZ09Jpcpz5aFewgCNcBGAsYHQ/s1600/1602179189006466-0.pngThese settings have been chosen in the Randomizer form below. Click the “Randomize Now!” button to get your results.

Note: The Randomizer form and this assignment are adapted from Research Randomizer and Social Psychology Network, all rights reserved.

Tutorial: Lesson 2 of 4

Random Assignment of 40 Participants to 4 Conditions

Although people sometimes confuse random assignment with random sampling, the two are really quite different. With random sampling, the goal is to choose a representative set of cases from a larger population. With random assignment, the goal is usually to give all participants an equal chance of being assigned to each experimental condition (regardless of how representative the participants are).

Suppose, for example, that you’re a medical researcher testing doses of a new drug, and you want to randomly assign 40 volunteers to 4 experimental conditions:

  •     Condition 1 = Wonderdrug 5%
  •     Condition 2 = Wonderdrug 10%
  •     Condition 3 = Wonderdrug 15%
  •     Condition 4 = Placebo

You would begin by giving each volunteer an identification number (Participant 001, 002, 003, etc.), and then use the Randomizer form to generate 1 set of 40 non-unique, unsorted numbers with a range from 1 to 4 (representing the four conditions). 

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-SmW8rHLsV0s/X39Qc7p1axI/AAAAAAAAAKs/H3lw_9MqbcsXL34daABaBF50sYWJ2omGACNcBGAsYHQ/s1600/1602179184399183-1.png

Tutorial: Lesson 3 of 4

Random Assignment of 40 Participants in Blocks of 4

In Lesson 2, 40 volunteers were randomly assigned to one of 4 experimental conditions, but the result was that only 7 participants ended up in Condition 1—half the number that ended up in Condition 2. This kind of result is common in random assignment, just as tossing a coin 20 times usually leads to a different result than exactly 10 Heads and 10 Tails.

Unfortunately, large differences in sample size can interfere with certain statistical tests. One way around this problem is to use a “blocked design” in which participants are randomly assigned within a block of trials. In the drug experiment from Lesson 2, for example, we could divide the 40 volunteers into 10 blocks of 4 participants and then randomly assign each person within a block to one of the four experimental conditions, such as:

    Participant 001: Condition 3

    Participant 002: Condition 1

    Participant 003: Condition 4

    Participant 004: Condition 2

    Participant 005: Condition 4

    Participant 006: Condition 2

    Participant 007: Condition 1

    Participant 008: Condition 3

    (and so on)

To generate random numbers for this kind of blocked design, you would fill out the Randomizer form for 10 sets of 4 unique, unsorted numbers with a range from 1 to 4 (representing the four conditions). For this example, we will also use the “Place Markers Across” viewing option to simplify interpretation of the results.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Znp1eJ4DMoo/X39Qb9hTWfI/AAAAAAAAAKo/k4cbyScAiBQ_JVWddVb69PPWxpQTfFpSgCNcBGAsYHQ/s1600/1602179179995275-2.png

Tutorial: Lesson 4 of 4

Random Ordering (Assignment) of 25 Items on a Test

Researchers sometimes need to randomize the order that things are presented, such as items on a test (e.g., to reduce order effects or discourage cheating).

Here’s an example: To create three different orderings of a 25-item test, just give each of the 25 items a number (Item 01, 02, 03, etc.), and then set the Randomizer form to generate 3 sets (representing three different tests) of 25 unique, unsorted numbers with a range from 1 to 25 (representing the number of items).

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-oJVslM9Zf00/X39QajYD7XI/AAAAAAAAAKk/RKrrjozS4A8sPgwq0vFkeDpJibbvxyQOACNcBGAsYHQ/s1600/1602179174531733-3.png

Part 1: Draw a Random Sample

Suppose you have a numbered list of 100,000 students in a Coursera class, and you want to email a random sample of 150 students an invitation to participate in a study you’re conducting. In the past this task would have been very time consuming, but by using the Randomizer form below, you can generate the results in less than a minute. Simply fill out the form, click the “Randomize Now!” button, and submit your answer to complete this part of the assignment.

Note: It doesn’t matter whether you sort the numbers in this case, because the full sample of 150 students will be emailed all at once, but please check everything else carefully before clicking the button. 

 

 


 


 

Part 2: Carry Out Random Assignment

 

Let’s suppose that 90 students from Part 1 agree to participate in your study, and you number them from 1 to 90. In this last part of the assignment, your task is to assign each participant to one of three experimental conditions (for example, the first person might be assigned to Condition 2, the next to Condition 1, the next to Condition 3, the next to Condition 1, and so on). To complete this step, just generate 30 sets of random numbers ranging from 1 to 3 so that within each block of three students, one person is randomly assigned to each different condition.

 

Part 2: Carry Out Random Assignment

 

Important link: